Este foro ha sido actualizado a una versión más reciente, segura y estable de phpBB.
Si tenéis problemas para acceder con vuestra contraseña deberéis resetearla desde este enlace. Os llegará un email con un enlace para cambiarla.
Disculpar las molestias ocasionadas.

Algunas perlas

Moderadores: Nachobassman, yimijendriss, vaiges, Bartok, Peterkas, contrabajo, Knuckle, fley

Avatar de Usuario
Chirro
Colaborador
Mensajes: 2908
Registrado: Mié Jun 13, 2007 3:13 pm
Ubicación: Cartagena/Murcia

Algunas perlas

Mensajepor Chirro » Vie Feb 14, 2020 10:09 am

Como algunos sabéis, una de mis muchas manías, consiste en guardar en un documento frases y comentarios que leo por aquí y por allá. Algunas me han sido muy útiles. Casi todas (he visto que todas :roll: ) están en inglés, pero creo que merece la pena exponerlas. Si os parece interesante, ampliaré el tema (tengo muchiiiisimas).

Un saludote.

---

Compression is good for fixing things if you have a specific problem. For example, in my originals band I use a variety of right hand techniques (traditional two finger, slap, faux picking with the top of my index finger nail, etc) and having a compressor helps even out the volume difference between those techniques. There are other gigs I take where I don't need a compressor at all because I'm doing an R&B or latin jazz thing and my right hand technique is pretty static the whole time.

That being said, knowing your way around a compressor is a good skill to have, especially if it has many of the traditional controls (attack, release, threshold, ratio, knee, etc). The tricky thing about it is it's not really an effect, but a tool. The results of properly using a compressor are usually subtle and many people really can't hear the difference, as the effect is just reducing wave form peaks. Also, often times the effect itself is very momentary and can be measured in milliseconds, so it's easy to miss what is happening.

---

My personal recipe for "sound guy of questionable abilities" is: compressor + HPF + LPF + DI

That way I'm sending them a signal lacking in the following four qualities, which can be the most difficult for inexperienced sound techs to troubleshoot:

Strong dynamic peaks
Low lows
High highs
A microphone in the signal path

---

I think the biggest difference between unplugged and amplified is dynamic range. The amplified sound has a huge dynamic range compared to unplugged, which makes it difficult to practice technique without an amplifier.

However, this is where compression comes in...

---

Keep in mind that 125hz and (especially) 250hz are problem low-end frequencies in almost any room and folks will blame bass and kick when its actually a conglomeration of everything, including mics and mic stand vibration

---

Lot's of performance venues have really poor acoustics that significantly degrade the sound, making it difficult to hear as well as you like. So you have to either accept a compromise where you can't hear very well, or you wind up getting in a volume war with the other musicians who are having the same problem. IEMs take the acoustics out of the equation for the performers so each player can hear clearly (assuming everyone has a custom stereo mix). Also by reducing or eliminating the stage wash, the FOH mix typically can have increased clarity at a lower volume.

---

Our job as bass players is to support the singer, make the singer sound good, and not step on the vocals. That’s where the phrase "playing for the song" comes into play. You don’t want to play licks when the singer is singing.

---

"The note is only 20%. The ATTITUDE of the motherfucker it's 80%." Miles Davies

---

One thing I’ve learned: If you play with poor musicians long enough, and you’re a good bassist, you will start doubting your abilities.

---

The amateur practices until he gets it right. The professional practices until he can’t get it wrong.

---

"This band sucks" = bad bass tone
"That singer is so hot" = good bass tone.

---

1) 99.99% of the audience can’t tell the difference between one bass or another.
2) 99.99% of your tone comes from your fingers, regardless of what bass you’re playing.
3) The right answer is play whatever makes you (and your bandmates) happy.

---

I am a full time musician and my primary instrument is the bass. So, here we go

1. Work really hard.
2. Make todays weakness tomorrows strength.
3. Repeat step 2.
4. Make sure if anyone asks someone if they know you, the response will be along the lines of "i love that guy" or "yeah he's a great dude". If thats not happening, you're not going to work.
5. If you want to be a pro, act like one. When you treat it like a job you'll be surprised how quickly it can become a job. Bear in mind a job is a 40 hour work week - put that much time into giving others a reason to pay you for your services. That may be networking, practicing, web presence, cool hairdo, anything really. Do the work and you'll get the reward.

---

The ability to follow an arrangement and blend in with the rest of the band. A "root note" player who can memorize arrangements is always preferable to a flashy one who gets lost and causes train wrecks.

---

I enjoy being able to visualize a key center via a note on the A string and have a single octave pattern moving up and down. (It's a visualization trick that I found in Anthony Wellington's column) .

---

To me, a great bassist is one that plays interesting parts that make the song sound better. Few do that as well as McCartney. I consider him one of the best. On the other hand, much of the Jaco catalog that many bassists rave about is not something I personally care to hear again after the first listen.

---

A few years back I attended a clinic with Bryan Beller. He was playing a very nice Mike Lull jazz bass. It sounded amazing. I asked how he got that tone and he said, "I don't know man, whatever bass I play sounds like me", then he handed me the bass and said, "Give it a try". I played the exact same bass, through the exact same rig, and it sounded like crap. Thin and lifeless. That made a huge impression on me and I stopped buying basses and gear and stopped trying to learn "chops" and hot licks. I focused on technique. I learned I'm a better player being really good at the basics than I am being bad at a bunch of stuff.

Just recently, the music director at my church told me, "Your playing has really improved". That was one of my proudest moments...because nothing had changed other than my touch on the bass.

---

Ya me callo :mrgreen:
No importa lo rápido o pirotécnico que puedas ser. Te van a valorar por el groove que puedas crear.

Avatar de Usuario
jafp
BAJ
BAJ
Mensajes: 526
Registrado: Lun Feb 08, 2010 8:47 pm
Ubicación: Elx

Re: Algunas perlas

Mensajepor jafp » Vie Feb 14, 2020 11:09 am

¡Qué bueno! y qué buena costumbre. Tienes el resumen de horas y horas de lectura. Y algunos consejos que son oro en paño.

Gracias por compartirlo. Seguro que lo releo de tanto en tanto

Avatar de Usuario
jafp
BAJ
BAJ
Mensajes: 526
Registrado: Lun Feb 08, 2010 8:47 pm
Ubicación: Elx

Re: Algunas perlas

Mensajepor jafp » Vie Feb 14, 2020 11:09 am

repe.

Peb16
B
B
Mensajes: 130
Registrado: Mar Oct 06, 2015 10:54 pm
Ubicación: Olot (Girona)

Re: Algunas perlas

Mensajepor Peb16 » Vie Feb 14, 2020 11:52 am

Muy buen aporte.

Este lo voy a colgar en la puerta del local de ensayo:

The amateur practices until he gets it right. The professional practices until he can’t get it wrong.

Gracias!

Avatar de Usuario
Anotherbassplayer
BAJISTA
BAJISTA
Mensajes: 3200
Registrado: Lun Nov 10, 2008 11:23 am
Ubicación: Madrid

Re: Algunas perlas

Mensajepor Anotherbassplayer » Vie Feb 14, 2020 12:23 pm

Muy buenas!

ibonbass
B
B
Mensajes: 74
Registrado: Mar Oct 09, 2018 7:04 pm

Re: Algunas perlas

Mensajepor ibonbass » Vie Feb 14, 2020 1:08 pm

buenísimas!

gracias :brindis:


Volver a “Hablando de música”

¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este Foro: No hay usuarios registrados visitando el Foro y 2 invitados